Fire the editor.

Fire EditorIf a paper is retracted because of falsified data the authors probably did terribly wrong things in the name of science. But there is another side of the equation: the journal editor.

Commercial journals make money by publishing scientists’ work. To keep their circulation and impact factor high, they have to lure the manuscripts that effect a ‘paradigm shift’.

Contrary to the common fallacy that the high-profile journals are brutally objective in manuscript selection, their editors give plenty of unnecessary opportunities to the authors to resubmit their shoddy work. In principle they send the letter that the manuscript is rejected but they would consider it as a new submission if the reviewers’ concerns are addressed.  In practice, they routinely override some valid criticism and concerns of the reviewers to publish the paper.

If an editor overrides the reviewers’ concerns and the paper is later retracted, what should be done?  I have to find out how the board of editors acts under these circumstances.  As far as I know, there are no serious consequences for the lapse of editorial judgement.

EMBO Journal has adopted a policy of publishing the review proceedings should the authors agree to it.  Such policy should be embraced by every decent scientific journal because it affirms that the readers are intelligent scientists who will understand the limitations of the research work.

As for the editorial veto of the reviewers’ concern that leads to retraction of a paper, some accountability is expected not only for the commercial success of the journal but because there is also tax-payers’ money involved.   I would say, ‘Fire the editor’.

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Scientific misconduct debate: The idea is getting traction.

We have all wondered about the debate over scientific misconduct and the utter lack of accountability demanded by the ‘system’. Earlier, I have written on this blog (Click here) that the privilege of using enormous amounts of public funds requires accountability from the scientists. Now, in the current issue of EMBO Reports, this idea has been featured by one of their editors (Click here). In addition, the journal commissioned at least three articles addressing different but related aspects of the rampant issues in contemporary scientific research.
Journals should not only concern themselves with the quality and validity of hypotheses, theories and data but they should also discuss how to improve the socio-economic framework of scientific research.  Discussing the ‘bread and butter’ issues of research are equally, if not more, important than vague policy matters.   At this point I should say that since the days of Frank Gannon as the editor of EMBO Reports, the journal has commendably highlighted the concerns of researchers.  Through advocacy of good research practices, the public trust can be won to improve funding.