Fire the editor.

Fire EditorIf a paper is retracted because of falsified data the authors probably did terribly wrong things in the name of science. But there is another side of the equation: the journal editor.

Commercial journals make money by publishing scientists’ work. To keep their circulation and impact factor high, they have to lure the manuscripts that effect a ‘paradigm shift’.

Contrary to the common fallacy that the high-profile journals are brutally objective in manuscript selection, their editors give plenty of unnecessary opportunities to the authors to resubmit their shoddy work. In principle they send the letter that the manuscript is rejected but they would consider it as a new submission if the reviewers’ concerns are addressed.  In practice, they routinely override some valid criticism and concerns of the reviewers to publish the paper.

If an editor overrides the reviewers’ concerns and the paper is later retracted, what should be done?  I have to find out how the board of editors acts under these circumstances.  As far as I know, there are no serious consequences for the lapse of editorial judgement.

EMBO Journal has adopted a policy of publishing the review proceedings should the authors agree to it.  Such policy should be embraced by every decent scientific journal because it affirms that the readers are intelligent scientists who will understand the limitations of the research work.

As for the editorial veto of the reviewers’ concern that leads to retraction of a paper, some accountability is expected not only for the commercial success of the journal but because there is also tax-payers’ money involved.   I would say, ‘Fire the editor’.

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Should Scientific Misconduct be Criminalized?

It has been a while since the last post.  It was not a ‘mysterious disappearance’.  No, I have not been manhandled or killed.  Not yet.

I noticed an article (click here) that some vigilante group has been sending accusatory notices targeting stem-cell researchers of their wrongdoings.  This has rattled the researchers and the publishers alike.

Well, if you look at it, the business of science has been given a lot of freedom to operate, and enormous amounts of trust has been put into scientists’ integrity, when it comes to their conduct.

Scientists obtain sumptuous chunk of money from the exchequer and when bad things happen, they simply say, “Oops!  We fucked!”  There are practically no consequences to their misdeeds.

Publishing a research paper is an enormous undertaking.  It not only takes time, money and collaborative effort of the authors involved,  but it also affects a huge number of researchers across the globe.

When someone produces and publishes fraudulent data in a major journal, it means years of work and at least a quarter million dollar worth of time and reagent go down the toilet.

Who pays for this?  People pay for this.  But, all the culprit gets is a slap on the wrist.  The culprits are told not to participate in any publicly funded program in any manner, and sometimes, the institution washes its hands with them. That’s it.  In fact, in most cases, the culprit returns to science to continue.

When a junior scientist publishes fraudulent results, it takes a while before the results could be verified by other researchers.  There is the ‘window of opportunity’ during which the junior scientist moves on to find a cushy job and by the time the fraud is exposed, he or she has obtained job security.  The senior scientist, on the other hand, has nothing to lose because he/she can blame the person who has already left the lab.  So it is convenient to everyone.

Anywhere else, one would be tried in a criminal court for such misappropriation of public funds and will likely be thrown in the prison, if the guilt is proven.  Not in science.

Why?  Because it is a ‘noble’ profession.  Scientists walk with an aura around them that rivals that of the angels.  Some even think that they are gods.

So, the question is, whether such misbehavior of the unscrupulous scientists be pardoned, or it should be consider a criminal act?  Only public can decide.

Scientific misconduct: A prick-ly issue of gutless scientists.

Data forgery is a frikkin troublesome issue in scientific research.  It is the same story every time:  “The damned post-doc fucked up the data!  We are retracting the paper although so and so stands by his or her results.”

A lamentation recently appeared in a prominent science journal. A junior researcher in a scientist’s laboratory had fucked up some data that resulted in retraction of four papers and data from a few more paper are suspect. The writer was thankful that the prominent scientist’s image was not tarnished. Had it been, the author would have used spit to bring it to the original shine.

I mean come on, give me a break!  Don’t we have enough of this bullshit? Every time it happens, and it is happening a lot nowadays, an obituary of the paper is published and apology is issued for any inconvenience to the research community.  What about those other researchers who were genuinely working on a similar project and had contrary results?  Their bosses were whipping their rear ends for being incompetent and not being able to produce similar results as the pioneers.  They lost their credibility because some jerk happened to publish fake data.

And thank goodness the image of the senior scientist is not tarnished because it would be a bad press. (really?  who cares?) The big guy brings a lot of money to the institution  so that they can claim to have an internal investigation committee.

Don’t you think that the rot is a bit deeper?  How the hell two measly post-doc get away with four high profile papers with grafted data? Were they constantly providing data to fit the pet theory of the boss?  Was the jet-lagged senior scientist’s judgement obscured by the desire of giving a crushing blow to the competitor?

In politics, when someone screws up in a big way, the superior takes the responsibility of failure to oversee.  In science, it is all about the lowly post-doc’s mess.  The principal investigators, as they are called, drop the culprits like a hot potato. That is the easy way out.

Today, science has completely changed in its intensity, competition, and amount of money involved.  It is no more a recluse hobbyist’s muse.  With these changes have come the unwanted but expected problems.  Data forgery is one of them.  It is a big enough problem that the National Institute of Health, the largest scientific funding body in the world, has established an Office of Research Integrity that monitors these allegations.

Although there are many facets of this problem that involve the bench researcher, the institution, the scientific and technical journals and the research funding agency, still the senior scientists have to own their responsibility of directly or indirectly promoting data falsification and other scientific misconducts.  It is a prick-ly issue and it sure requires some guts to deal with.